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Two Sculpture Groups in Harrisburg to be included in The Italian Factor.

Updated: May 15

The Pennsylvania State Capitol sculpture groups are two magnificent works of art that adorn the west entrance of the building in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. They were created by American sculptor George Grey Barnard, who modeled them in clay and plaster in France between 1902 and 1911. The Piccirilli Brothers, famous marble carvers from New York City, transformed Barnard's models into white Carrara marble sculptures that weigh up to seven tons each.


Piccirilli, Montes-Bradley, The Italian Factor,
The Burden of Life: The Broken Law

Piccirilli, Montes-Bradley, The Italian Factor,
Love and Labor: The Unbroken Law

The south group is called The Burden of Life: The Broken Law, and it shows the consequences of disobeying God's law. It has a large bas-relief of Adam and Eve above it, and it depicts scenes of sorrow, hardship, and despair. However, it also suggests hope and comfort for those who repent. The north group is called Love and Labor: The Unbroken Law, and it shows the rewards of following God's law. It has a large bas relief of a prosperous farmer and his wife above it, and it depicts scenes of joy, success, and faith. It also celebrates the values of family, education, and religion.


Two Sculpture Groups in Harrisburg to be included in The Italian Factor


The Pennsylvania State Capitol sculpture groups are a masterpiece of American sculpture and a testament to Barnard's vision and skill. They reflect the history and culture of Pennsylvania and its people. The Italian Factor, a film by director Montes-Bradley, currently being filmed in and around Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, explores the story of these sculptures and their significance in the early years of the 20th Century.


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